Mad Father Review

At this point, it should be evident that I am more than happy to explore a more niche side of the already niche centric Japanese game industry, so it seems like it was only a matter of time before I delved into the super specific subgenre of Japanese horror games developed in consumer level RPG creation engines.  A genre I planned on exploring with the latest version of Corpse Party, but the game has gone through many permutations and it turns out that the PC version that I purchased is inferior to the recent 3DS release, who’d have thought?  So instead I’m reviewing Mad Father. Continue reading

Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight Review

20161226203425_1How to best begin… I guess with a history lesson.  Momodora is a series of action platformers that have been released since 2010.  They gradually grew from a series of freeware games into what is seen here with the fourth entry in the series, Reverie Under the Moonlight.  I personally have only played the third game, and I barely remember doing so, but it left enough of an impression on me to gravitate me towards the latest entry.  Which also happened to quite noticeably influenced by the Souls series, to the point where I saw people lovingly refer to the game as MomoSouls. Continue reading

D4: Dark Dreams Don’t Die Review

20160312112351_1“Electric Nigma! Electric Nigma!”  Um, actually I go by Natalie now.  “Whatever! Why are you reviewing D4 now?  Haven’t you owned it for almost a year now?”  Yes, I have owned it for several months. I did not review it because I was afraid I would not like it after playing it for 20 minutes.  “But didn’t you adore Deadly Premonition?”  I still do, but that’s not how enjoying things works.  If you are a good girl, I’ll tell you why in the form of a review.  “Natalie! Natalie!”  What?  “Do you feel like an insignificant creature who will never accomplish anything of worth in their sad little life?”  …I’m glad I’m killing you off. Continue reading

LiEat Review

2016-02-29_00017One of my biggest worries for the future of the medium is how people will find, uncover, and catalog the thousands of games that come out each and every year. Especially with Steam opening the floodgates for any small time developer with a Unity license and a nifty idea. The problem gets worse when you consider how many games are not made for a specific language, namely the scrappy little mutt that is English. But somehow small freeware titles like LiEat can still be picked up and sold by the folks at Playism. Continue reading