Gurumin: A Monstrous Adventure Review

Falcom is a very odd developer.  A long standing Japanese developer with a history based in creating games for older Japanese computers and creating a wide variety of innovations in the RPG genre while primarily being known for Trails, a series of incredibly detailed JRPGs with a strong fanbase, and the Ys series, a collection of action RPG titles that shifted and mutated its exact genre over the years, and is home to some of my favorite examples of the genre of all time.  Yet they can also be very experimental, as seen previously in games like Xanadu Next, which I reviewed a few months ago, and even more so in one of the more unique titles in their release history, Gurumin. Continue reading

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Nigmabox Rundown (10/15-10/21) A Master No More!

Over the past few weeks, there has been a distribution going on for the new legendary Pokemon, Marshadow, which was distributed at GameStop in the United States.  Unfortunately, I missed my chance to visit one to get the mode needed to get the new Pokemon and preserve my complete Pokedex.  Why is that the case?  Well, I am not very mobile on my own (I cannot drive) and the task of asking my mother if I could stop by one of these stores was a bit too much for me, what with my social anxiety and such.  I downplay it a lot, but my social anxiety and poor social skills makes it genuinely hard to do even basic tasks.  I feel awkward so much as saying hello to someone unless they greet me first. Continue reading

Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony Review

Following the Danganronpa series over the past few years has been a turbulent ride, spanning over two excellent visual novels, a decent third person shooter that I should really revisit, an anime series that I railed on for 7 pages and still feel as if I was being a bit too generous towards, and various fan translated spin-off media that I never really checked out.  However, all of that seemingly comes to a close with Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony. Continue reading

Nigmabox Rundown (10/8-10/14) The Return of Press-Switch!

After three years of eager anticipation, it has finally happened.  Press-Switch has finally been updated!  For those unaware, or have forgotten, Press-Switch is an absurdly expansive freeware visual novel centered around body swapping, mind alteration, possession, cloning, merging and all kinds of fun stuff.  While it may seem like some sort of fetish driven excursion, which it is at least to some extent, the level of detail, variety, and complexity in its story has turned it into something far greater that I could have ever expected, and I cannot say enough good things about the game. Continue reading

Dysfunctional Systems: Learning to Manage Chaos Review

Sometimes I really should do more research into the games I review before selecting them, because oh boy is this one a doozy.  Originally released in 2013, Dysfunctional Systems: Learning to Manage Chaos is the first episode as part of a visual novel series envisioned by its developers, Dischan.  Following the success of the first installment, the company held a  Kickstarter for three additional episodes of Dysfunctional Systems, including a prequel episode, a far longer second episode, and a climactic third episode to wrap everything up.  Unfortunately, things went wrong, and the series went dark in 2015, and it was not until 2017 that episode 0, Dysfunctional Systems: Orientation was released, with development on the second episode restarting afterwards.  That should have dissuaded me from reviewing this game, but scheduling conflicts prevented me from affording such a luxury. Continue reading

Nigmabox Rundown (10/1-10/7) My Dear’s Danganronpa Dilemma

Over this past week I have been making my way through Danganronpa V3 while my significant other has been doing the same.  We have been discussing the game in detail as we continued our parallel playthroughs, and during that discussion, they revealed that they did not know that you could save during a class trial.  They assumed that a massive portion of a game, one part of a portable game series, would arbitrarily prohibit saving, and require players to rush through the entire 2+ hour trial in a single session.  They somehow never figured this out despite playing Danganronpa 1 and 2, as theynever opened the menu over the span of 20+ hours of class trials in those games.  This baffled me so much that I could not stop myself from sharing it. Continue reading

2064: Read Only Memories Review

I’ve noticed that as of late more and more titles are coming out with original base versions of a game before being updated, either continuously or all at once, to become more substantial and improved experiences.  I know why this is the case, but it always makes me reluctant to check out a game unless I know it is fully complete and will not be given substantial updates after the fact, as I want to have my first experience with something be in its best rendition.  I bring this up because that is exactly what happened with me and the original release of Read Only memories, and then I forgot it was updated until about two weeks ago.  Whoops. Continue reading